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Amy Schumer’s latest Instagram post brought forward an inappropriate question, but the quick-witted comedian’s come-back was perfect. Getting a little too personal Amy is never shy in coming forward with the more personal details of her life and her fans generally love and admire her natural openness. However, her recent Instagram post, an adorable picture […]

The post Amy Schumer’s perfect response when asked how she’d cope if her son has autism appeared first on Babyology.

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The Bachelor alum, jewellery designer and brand new mum Laura Byrne has opened up about her and fiancé Matty J’s family plans revealing that they’re aiming to marry sometime in late 2020 – and that more kids are on the cards then too! Absolutely wonderful The couple welcomed their first child Marlie-May together back in […]

The post The Bachelor’s Laura Byrne talks baby number two – and her postpartum infection appeared first on Babyology.

6 important tools to raise body positive children

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Posted on: August 17, 2019

https://www.mother.ly/child/how-to-raise-kids-with-a-positive-body-image

In prior decades, body image issues usually didn’t hit the scene until kids reached adolescence. But thanks to social media, and our culture’s relentless pursuit of thinness, we now have to find creative ways to teach young children how to develop healthy body images.

Before I dive into some practical tips to help kids improve body image, I want to first diminish any shame that you might be feeling if you have body issues of your own. It’s so important to remember that you downloaded every internal message from somewhere else. Of course, it’s critical to work on your own issues, but it’s also important to know it is not your fault that you developed them in the first place!

So, whether you are struggling with your own body image, or you love your body, here are some tools to help your child feel better about the precious body he or she lives in:

1. Break the spell

How do you know if your child has a bad body image? Perhaps they’ve begun making negative comments about their size or shape. Maybe they are comparing their body to others. Maybe they are avoiding foods or activities they once enjoyed because they feel uncomfortable about their body.

Often the most common response a parent has is to reassure their child that they are “fine,” or “beautiful” or “perfect.” And while there is certainly nothing wrong with some reassurance, it simply may not be enough to overpower the cultural messages kids are surrounded by. Reassure them that they are perfect just the way they are.

2. Unkind mind, kind mind and quiet mind

This little menu of options encourages kids to identify and differentiate between three different thinking states within themselves. I refer to them as “mind moods.” Try teaching your child about these three states of mind and brainstorming examples of each. For example, unkind mind = “I hate my thighs.” Kind mind = “I love singing.” Quiet mind = Peacefully resting or playing.

This will raise their awareness of their thoughts and help them to choose their
mind moods more consciously. As they learn to turn up the volume of their kind minds and spend more time in their quiet minds, they begin to feel more present and peaceful.

Once you have helped your child identify their
unkind mind as a distinct voice, they can then try on some different responses and see which ones help bring them some relief. Try asking them to write or say all the messages their
unkind mind is saying and practicing using strong, soft, silly or silent responses. Kids can learn that their unkind mind is not all of who they are, and that it doesn’t have to run the show.

3. Get to the root

This concept helps kids discover what triggers their body dissatisfaction. You can help your child by asking questions or taking guesses about what might have started their bad body image. For example, I helped one 7-year old get to the root of her body obsession by noticing it started when there was a death in her family. Right around that time, her best friend started talking about dieting, so she latched onto food obsession as a distracting coping tool.

Once we uncovered this, she was able to learn about healthy grieving and truly healthy eating (as opposed to what the diet culture deems as healthy—which can actually be
unhealthy).

4. Mind movies vs. really real

Try asking your child to show you some things around them that are real (i.e. things they can see, touch or hear). Then ask them if they can show you one single thought in their minds. You can playfully challenge them to take a thought out of their head and show it to you or fold it up and put it in their pocket.
This tool teaches kids how to be more present.

Of course, they might use their imagination to do this, but with some finesse, you can teach your child to distinguish between the
mind movies that cause them stress and the really real things around them. This is an immensely helpful tool that will not only help them with body image (since body image is one long mind movie) but will also improve the quality of their lives in general.

5. Dog talk and cat chat

Many kids cannot relate to the concept of being kind to themselves but ask a child how they feel about their favorite pet, and a doorway to their compassion, kindness and unconditional acceptance opens. For non-pet lovers, you can ask your child to imagine how they would speak to a baby or their best friend.

Dog talk and cat chat can help teach youngsters how to take the loving words and tones they use toward a beloved pet, and direct these sentiments toward themselves and their bodies.

6. Do an internal upgrade

In addition to helping your child combat the messages they receive out in the world, you can also work on the messages they get in your home. Again, if you struggle with body image, it is not your fault, but you
can work on healing—and not only will you feel more peace, but your child will benefit as well.

To the best of your ability, refrain from talking about foods as “good” or “bad.” Refrain from making negative comments about your (or anyone else’s) weight or looks. Refrain from praising someone (or yourself) for
weight loss
.

Practice welcoming your child’s tears and anger without trying to change their feelings before they are ready. Practice eating all food groups in moderation. Foster a positive, grateful attitude about
your body.

May you and your child feel comfortable in your bodies, eat all foods in moderation, move and rest in ways that feel good, and find abundant sweetness and fulfillment in life.

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While Duchess Kate often pays tribute to Princess Diana when it comes to her fashion and jewellery choices, Meghan’s also matched with her late mother-in-law – it’s just been a little more under-the-radar. Dressing with an agenda Diana had a lot of fun with fashion and wasn’t afraid to carve her own path and make […]

The post Perhaps you missed Meghan and Princess Diana’s cute matchy-matchy moment? appeared first on Babyology.