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February 2020 - Mood Baby

https://www.mother.ly/news/how-families-can-prepare-for-coronavirus

If you’ve turned on the news this week you know that Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is making headlines around the clock. The situation is constantly changing and it’s hard to know what to expect.

Reports that a Coronavirus patient in California wasn’t tested for the virus for days and that the same state is monitoring 8,400 people for possible cases have many parents alarmed, but as we said earlier this week, now is not the time to panic—it’s the time to prepare.

As the possible first case of “community spread” coronavirus in the U.S. is investigated, the first impulse on hearing the news is to run out and buy as many face masks as you can, but according to the CDC that’s not what we should be doing. Instead of panic-buying random supplies, be strategic in how you are stocking your home and your pantry, and how you are preparing your children for potential interruptions to daily life.

On Thursday the director-general of the World Health Organization said, “This is not a time for fear. This is the time for taking action now to prevent infections and save lives now.”

Now is the time for action, not anxiety, Here’s what you can do, mama.

1. Prepare your home for coronavirus outbreaks

Rebecca Katz, director of the Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University told NPR that the best place to start is with general emergency planning. This “means not only contingency planning but also good old-fashioned preparedness planning for your family,” says Katz.

If an outbreak happens, you won’t want to be running to Target for toilet paper and might not be able to order food. If you have prepared for a hurricane or another natural disaster, this won’t be much different. It’s like Disaster Planning 101, but instead of planning to evacuate our homes we’re planning to stay indoors for a significant amount of time.

2. “Store a two week supply of water and food” 

how to prepare for coronavirus

There’s no reason to panic, but you might want to do a Costco run soon and stock up on non-perishables.

FEMA and other agencies recommend packing emergency preparedness kits to make possible outbreaks of COVID-19 safer and less stressful for your family.

Here is what FEMA recommends parents do to prepare for a pandemic:

  • “Store a two week supply of water and food.
  • Periodically check your regular prescription drugs to ensure a continuous supply in your home.
  • Have any nonprescription drugs and other health supplies on hand, including pain relievers, stomach remedies, cough and cold medicines, fluids with electrolytes, and vitamins.
  • Get copies and maintain electronic versions of health records from doctors, hospitals, pharmacies and other sources and store them, for personal reference. Get help accessing electronic health records.
  • Talk with family members and loved ones about how they would be cared for if they got sick, or what will be needed to care for them in your home.”

Check with your insurance: You might have to get approval extended supplies of medication from your insurance provider, so make those calls sooner rather than later.

3. Make a childcare plan

The Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Dr. Nancy Messonnier, wants parents to prepare for the possibility that schools could be closed.

Having school close would be very disruptive for many families, but we can start getting ahead of it by doing the following:

  • Talk to your school and childcare providers about their plan for a possible outbreak or closure.
  • Talk to your employer about whether telecommuting or remote work is an option for you.
  • Discuss contingency plans with your partner or co-parent if you have one and how you will divide parenting duties if schools close but your workplaces remain open.

4. Be wary of scams

The snake-oil sellers are using the pandemic to fleece consumers, says the Federal Trade Commission. “They’re setting up websites to sell bogus products, and using fake emails, texts and social media posts as a ruse to take your money and get your personal information,” notes the FTC’s Consumer Education Specialist, Colleen Tressler.

“The emails and posts may be promoting awareness and prevention tips, and fake information about cases in your neighborhood. They also may be asking you to donate to victims, offering advice on unproven treatments, or contain malicious email attachments,” she explains.

Some scam emails are claiming to be from the CDC, but parents should know that the most up-to-date information is actually on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the World Health Organization (WHO) websites.

5. Don’t panic

The Coronavirus an be very serious, especially for elderly individuals, but “there is no evidence that children are more susceptible,” according to the CDC.

“In fact, most confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported from China have occurred in adults,” the CDC notes.

The CDC just wants people to be prepared for disruptions to daily life that might occur If there is a case in a community. When the virus is spreading the best way to stop it will be to close schools and businesses, even though that will most certainly be inconvenient.

In short, the experts aren’t telling us to be ready for the apocalypse, they just want us to be ready to stay home for as long as a couple of weeks. Stocking up on supplies now isn’t an over reaction, it’s just good emergency planning.

[Correction: A previous version of this story stated 8,400 people were being monitored possible cases in California. It is only 8,400. We deeply regret the error.]

1. Prepare your home for coronavirus outbreaks

Rebecca Katz, director of the Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University told NPR that the best place to start is with general emergency planning. This “means not only contingency planning but also good old-fashioned preparedness planning for your family,” says Katz.

If an outbreak happens, you won’t want to be running to Target for toilet paper and might not be able to order food. If you have prepared for a hurricane or another natural disaster, this won’t be much different. It’s like Disaster Planning 101, but instead of planning to evacuate our homes we’re planning to stay indoors for a significant amount of time.

2. “Store a two week supply of water and food” 

how to prepare for coronavirus

There’s no reason to panic, but you might want to do a Costco run soon and stock up on non-perishables.

FEMA and other agencies recommend packing emergency preparedness kits to make possible outbreaks of COVID-19 safer and less stressful for your family.

Here is what FEMA recommends parents do to prepare for a pandemic:

  • “Store a two week supply of water and food.
  • Periodically check your regular prescription drugs to ensure a continuous supply in your home.
  • Have any nonprescription drugs and other health supplies on hand, including pain relievers, stomach remedies, cough and cold medicines, fluids with electrolytes, and vitamins.
  • Get copies and maintain electronic versions of health records from doctors, hospitals, pharmacies and other sources and store them, for personal reference. Get help accessing electronic health records.
  • Talk with family members and loved ones about how they would be cared for if they got sick, or what will be needed to care for them in your home.”

Check with your insurance: You might have to get approval extended supplies of medication from your insurance provider, so make those calls sooner rather than later.

3. Make a childcare plan

The Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Dr. Nancy Messonnier, wants parents to prepare for the possibility that schools could be closed.

Having school close would be very disruptive for many families, but we can start getting ahead of it by doing the following:

  • Talk to your school and childcare providers about their plan for a possible outbreak or closure.
  • Talk to your employer about whether telecommuting or remote work is an option for you.
  • Discuss contingency plans with your partner or co-parent if you have one and how you will divide parenting duties if schools close but your workplaces remain open.

4. Be wary of scams

The snake-oil sellers are using the pandemic to fleece consumers, says the Federal Trade Commission. “They’re setting up websites to sell bogus products, and using fake emails, texts and social media posts as a ruse to take your money and get your personal information,” notes the FTC’s Consumer Education Specialist, Colleen Tressler.

“The emails and posts may be promoting awareness and prevention tips, and fake information about cases in your neighborhood. They also may be asking you to donate to victims, offering advice on unproven treatments, or contain malicious email attachments,” she explains.

Some scam emails are claiming to be from the CDC, but parents should know that the most up-to-date information is actually on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the World Health Organization (WHO) websites.

5. Don’t panic

The Coronavirus an be very serious, especially for elderly individuals, but “there is no evidence that children are more susceptible,” according to the CDC.

“In fact, most confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported from China have occurred in adults,” the CDC notes.

The CDC just wants people to be prepared for disruptions to daily life that might occur If there is a case in a community. When the virus is spreading the best way to stop it will be to close schools and businesses, even though that will most certainly be inconvenient.

In short, the experts aren’t telling us to be ready for the apocalypse, they just want us to be ready to stay home for as long as a couple of weeks. Stocking up on supplies now isn’t an over reaction, it’s just good emergency planning.

[Correction: A previous version of this story stated 8,400 people were being monitored possible cases in California. It is only 8,400. We deeply regret the error.]

https://www.mother.ly/child/the-science-benefits-of-roughhousing-with-your-kids-that-will-make-you-less-anxious

There are feet and elbows and squeals and shrieks, followed by laughing—lots of laughing—thumps and grunts. I watch, waiting for my youngest to smack his head on the coffee table or my oldest to sit a little too long on the middle one’s chest, worried that it’s not really fun until someone gets hurt.

I don’t know if it is amusement, amazement or annoyance I feel as I watch their dad in the middle of it all, tossing them around, spinning them and flipping them, altogether keeping the energy at a frenzy, sweating and panting right along. And I wonder who is having more fun?

To a mom, all the noise and pummeling can be more than a little bit alarming. But lots of research suggests that regular roughhousing sessions make for happier, more successful children.

In fact, in Top Dog, a book about the science of winning and losing, authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman argue that roughhousing can give your kids a competitive edge and help them learn to thrive in an increasingly dog-eat-dog world.

We know intuitively that something magical is going on when dad gets down on the floor and lets little ones give it to him. Even if we are more than a little uneasy with all the activity, somehow we know the special give and take that goes on is fundamental to how our kids relate to him.

But are we aware of how that relationship affects how our kids see the world and themselves in it, or that roughhousing can help protect against childhood depression?

Maybe if we understand that roughhousing is a good way for kids to release aggression, or that it teaches our kids how to set boundaries, we can relax and enjoy watching the show.

As moms, every fiber of our being has been devoted to nourishing, nurturing and protecting our babies from before that first beautiful cry was heard to those first wobbly steps and beyond. The journey has brought us closer and made us more connected and in tune with our children than we could have ever imagined.

The first few years, our children’s development requires more from us, with dads as active participants who, for the most part, follow our lead. But by nature, there comes a time and place where dads’ involvement and subsequent bond grows independently and quite importantly.

“A mother’s bond is established in infancy, and researchers believe that dad’s bond is expressed a little later, when the father serves as a secure base allowing the child to explore and take risks,” says University of Georgia researcher Geoffrey Brown, lead author of a 2012 study in the Journal of Family Psychology on fundamental questions about how fathers bond with children.

What is roughhousing?

Roughhousing is essentially mutual, aggressive, interactive, high-trust play in which no one is actually getting hurt. Kids feel more relaxed, connected, and happy after roughhousing. This is critical in establishing a deep and lasting bond with dads that lays the foundation for the part of their development that helps them function successfully in the world and pave the way for future generations’ success and happiness by properly socializing kids to be good parents themselves. The good news is that roughhousing comes in many shapes and sizes, so dads who are more adverse to the extreme physicality of many forms can easily find others that suit their style better.

Recent research has shown that roughhousing serves an evolutionary purpose. Unlike many other animals, humans need their fathers well beyond just the act of making the baby. Based on research by MacDonald and Parke, fathers play key roles in optimum development of psychological and emotional traits like empathy, emotional control and the ability to navigate complex social relationships.

“Perhaps out of worry for their kids’ future financial security, dads across human cultures mostly focus on preparing children to compete within society. They give advice, encourage academic success and stress achievement,” says David Geary of the University of Missouri and author of Male, Female: Evolution of Human Sex Differences.

By roughousing, dads “rile them up, almost to the point that they are going to snap, and then calm them down,” explains Geary. “This pattern teaches kids to control their emotions—a trait that garners them popularity among superiors and peers,” he said. “As adults, they are more likely to form secure relationships, achieve stable social standing and become able parents. In this sense, a father who takes care of his children also gives his grandchildren a leg up.”

Science supports the need for this kind of activity.

“We know quite a lot about how important fathers are in general for a child’s development,” says Richard Fletcher, the leader of the Fathers and Families Research Program at the University of Newcastle in Australia (UON), in an interview on ABC News.

Though all the rolling around and noise on the floor may look like theres just a lot of fun being had, Fletcher and UON researchers believe that the most important aspect of roughhousing is that it gives children “a sense of achievement when they ‘defeat’ a more powerful adult, building their self-confidence and concentration.”

In their study, researchers watched film of 30 dads roughhousing with their kids. “When you look at fathers and their young children playing, you can see that for the child, it’s not just a game. They obviously enjoy it and they’re giggling, but when you watch the video, you can see that child is concentrating really hard. I think the excitement is related to the achievement that’s involved,” Fletcher says. “It’s not about a spoiled child not wanting to lose, I think that child is really striving for the achievement of succeeding.”

What it does to your child’s brain

There is a lot of science to reinforce the value of roughhousing. A lot of it can be tied to one salient fact: Roughhousing releases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

Based on research by the Child Mental Health Centre’s Margot Sutherland, when kids roughhouse, the brain recognizes this as a small stressor. As heart rate increases, the brain thinks they are fighting or fleeing some danger. To protect the brain from stress, BDNF is released, which repairs and protects the brain while improving it’s learning and memory capabilities. Stimulating neuron growth in the cortex-amygdala, cerebellum and hippocampus regions of the brain, BDNF is vitally important and responsible for the development of memory, higher learning and advanced behavior, such as language and logic–skills necessary for academic success. This growth underpins a myriad of benefits for our kids.

Why we roughhouse

Some parents worry that roughhousing teaches kids to be violent and impulsive. In their book, The Art of Roughhousing, Anthony DeBenedet and Larry Cohen claim instead that roughhousing “makes kids smart, emotionally intelligent, lovable and likable, ethical, physically fit, and joyful.”

Other studies have indicated that kids who aren’t allowed to roughhouse can develop inappropriate responses to aggression, imagining threats where none exist, according to research by Daniel Paquette, a Professor of Psychoeducation at the University of Montreal.

“Parent-child roughhousing enables kids to explore aggression within the context of an emotional bond. By practicing aggression in a safe environment as a kid, they learn to be comfortable with it and take more risks as an adult, whether it’s by standing up to a bullying colleague or asking for a raise. In particular, fathers play a critical role in helping kids develop these skills,” he says.

In Paquette’s surveys of children’s behavior for the University of Montreal, kid-initiated roughhousing peaks at around three or four, but continues until about age 10. During that time, Psychologist Anthony Pellegrini has found that “the amount of roughhousing children engage in predicts their achievement in first grade better than their kindergarten test scores do.”

Roughhousing is a fun and safe place to teach your kids that failure is often just a temporary state and that victory goes to the person who is resilient, sticks to it and learns from his mistakes.

As a parent, resilience and grit are two of the best things you can help your kids develop. “Since resilience is a key in developing children’s intelligence, resilient kids tend to see failure more as a challenge to overcome rather than an event that defines them. This sort of intellectual resilience helps ensure your children bounce back from bad grades and gives them the grit to keep trying until they’ve mastered a topic,” says Pellegrini. The ability to bounce back from failures helps your kids face challenges and reach their full potential, living happier lives as adults.

Though on its surface it appears rather brutish, roughhousing is really quite sophisticated, requiring the coordination of three aspects of human intelligence: physical, social and cognitive. When in concert, these aspects provide the sweet notes of our kids’ lives, but when out of balance can make for some sad music.

10 ways kids benefit from roughhousing

1. It rewires the brain, making kids smarter.

Roughhousing requires our kids to adapt quickly to unpredictable situations. In his book, Wild Justice, evolutionary biologist, Marc Bekoff, says, “The unpredictable nature of roughhousing actually rewires a child’s brain by increasing the connections between neurons in the cerebral cortex, which in turn contributes to behavioral flexibility. Learning how to cope with sudden changes while roughhousing trains your kiddos to cope with unexpected bumps in the road when they’re out in the real world.”

2. It teaches children about taking turns and cooperation.

Roughhousing teaches kids the concept of leadership and negotiation. Physical games require the give-and-take of negotiation to establish the rules upon which everyone needs to agree in order for all to have fun. This is excellent preparation for both professional success and committed relationships.

Roughhousing also requires taking turns with the dominant role. Whether you’re the wrestler or the wrestlee, everyone has to take turns in for the fun to continue. Kids don’t want to keep playing if they are constantly on the losing side.

3. It toughens kids up.

Occasional scuffs and scrapes are a byproduct of roughhousing and are bound to happen. Rather than coddle, dads tend to distract their kids from the pain with humor or some other task.

In a study of 32 subjects in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, researchers found that many fathers walk a fine line during roughousing between safety and risk, allowing children to get minor injuries without endangering them. Learning to deal with and manage minor discomforts while roughhousing can help kids handle the stresses they’ll encounter at school and work.

4. It teaches kids to take risks.

Beckoff states that roughhousing is good for learning because “it provides an opportunity for making mistakes without fear of punishment.” And because “fathers play a particularly important role in the development of children’s openness to the world,” writes Paquette, “they also tend to encourage children to take risks, while at the same time ensuring [their] safety and security, thus permitting children to learn to be braver in unfamiliar situations, as well as to stand up for themselves.”

5. It helps kids manage aggression.

Some parents fear that roughhousing will lead to aggression and that we should always be “safe” with our children. While this is a concern, studies perfomed at the University of Regensburg in Germany suggest that it actually has the opposite effect.

Children who roughhouse at home are less violent, presumably because they feel a strong connection with their fathers and because they learn the difference between healthy roughhousing and aggression. As psychologist John Snarey says in his research-turned-book, How Fathers Care for the Next Generation, “Children who roughhouse with their fathers… quickly learn that biting, kicking, and other forms of physical violence are not acceptable.”

Girls have aggressive feelings, too, and few know how to deal with them. Roughhousing provides the same benefits to them as it does to boys. Occasionally, roughhousing can lead to tears—play may have activated feelings that needed to come out, and they are coming out in tears rather than laughter and body slams. It turns out that roughhousing can help “mean girls” access their feelings more directly, which cuts down on the meanness.

7. It increases social and emotional intelligence.

“The ability to differentiate between play and aggression translates into other social skills that require people to read and interpret social cues,” says Pellegrini. Kids need to learn when to stop. In a report published in Behavioral Neuroscience, Jennifer Mascaro and her colleagues at Emory University state that, “rough play mimics aggressive actions, and requires accurate reading of social cues to determine when the rough and tumble tickling or fighting has gone too far, or if someone is feeling hurt. That requires evaluating other people’s emotional state and determining when the feelings pass the threshold from fun and play to fear and anger.”

Play expert and founder of The National Institute for Play, Dr. Stuart Brown, says that the “lack of experience with [roughhousing] hampers the normal give-and-take necessary for social mastery and has been linked with poor control of violent impulses later in life. When kids roughhouse they learn to tell the difference between play and actual aggression,” making them more well-liked, compared to kids who have a hard time separating the two.

Moreover, kids learn how to regain self-control, which makes them more confident in their emotional lives.

8. It teaches kids about boundaries, ethics and morality.

When we roughhouse with our kids, they learn the difference between right and wrong and about the appropriate use of strength and power. Roughhousing also teaches children about setting limits and boundaries while being safe when they play with others.

In nature, self-handicapping is one of the most amazing illustrations of moral behavior in animal play. “When we roughhouse with our kids, we model for them how someone bigger and stronger holds back. We teach them self-control, fairness, and empathy. We let them win, which gives them confidence and demonstrates that winning isn’t everything and you don’t need to dominate all the time,” say DeBenedet and Cohen.

According to Bekoff, this is moral behavior because the larger the animal cares more about both players having fun together than it does about winning. Kids learn that actual strength is showing compassion to those weaker than you.

9. It makes kids physically active and can protect them from depression.

“Being active, getting sweaty and roughhousing offer more than just physical health benefits. They also protect against depression,” says Tonje Zahl, a Ph.D. candidate at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), and first author of the article on the study findings which were recently published in the February 2017 issue of Pediatrics.

Her new study supports that this kind of physical activity protects against depression. The researchers at the NTNU examined just under 800 children when they were six years old and conducted follow-up examinations with about 700 of them when they were eight and ten years old to see if they could find a correlation between physical activity and symptoms of depression. They found that the more the kids engaged in activity that caused them to sweat and pant, the less incidence there was of depression.

10. Roughhousing builds a better bond.

The rough play fathers engage in is just as important as the gentle mothering that mothers do. Roughhousing offers dads a chance to show physically their affection to their kids in a fun and playful manner. Throwing kids up in the air and catching them, or swinging them upside-down, builds kids’ trust in you—by taking part in somewhat risky activities with you, your kids learn that they can trust you to keep them safe. And as dads tumble around with kids, the closeness and physical activity release the parenting hormone, oxytocin, which boosts feelings of bonding and closeness.

It’s not just for dads and sons

Just as fathers can be super midnight soothers, mothers can be awesome roughhousers. This is especially important, since not all children have fathers. “If a mom does it, the child will learn the same thing,” says Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, a professor of developmental psychology at New York University. And moms who roughhouse with their kids give them a whole new set of behaviors to figure out and learn from.

All kids need loving physical contact, and both boys and girls need to get it from their fathers. In roughhousing, dads and kids get the endorphin rush of athletics as well as the oxytocin rush of a good hug, benefitting both the same way that the release of oxytocin does when a child is being comforted or is nursing.

Importantly, DeBenedet says roughhousing can benefit both genders, often in different ways. “For boys, it’s a way to learn physical interaction that isn’t violent or sexual. For girls, it’s finding a way to make sure their voice is heard.”

So, what can you do to remain sane while watching all of this go down?

  • Be aware of the surroundings Keep your kids away from areas where they can get hurt. Also, keep in mind that a child’s joints are prone to injury when roughhousing.
  • Watch for and respect clues Ensure that roughhousing has not gone too far and that everyone is still having fun.
  • Don’t roughhouse right before bed Kids need some time right before bed to relax and ramp things down so they can get into sleep mode.
  • Remember that roughhousing is for girls, too While boys are naturally prone to engage in roughhousing, make sure you don’t leave girls out of the fun. Studies show that girls who roughhouse with their fathers are more confident than girls who don’t. And some studies even indicate that roughhousing can prevent your little angel from being a mean girl that psychologically terrorizes other girls.

The Art of Roughhousing recommends specific things you can do with your kids while roughhousing, along with helpful illustrations showing you how to do them. Also, you can visit the website for additional roughhousing ideas.

In the end, roughhousing may be alarming but is truly necessary for proper development to take place—all that tumbling and tackling helps develop strength, flexibility and complex motor learning, in addition to concentration, cardiovascular fitness, and coordination. Additionally, tossing kids in the air and spinning them around provides early vestibular stimulation (the input that your body receives when you experience movement or gravity), which is important for balance and may be a building block for future athleticism.

And there is one more surprising bonus: Roughhousing makes parenting easier by providing a positive outlet for big feelings so they don’t get worked out in more problematic ways. If we use roughhousing to improve communication and to impart values that influence our children’s attitude at home, with peers and at school, we can learn how they react to success, failures and obstacles, and we can build a special bond to guide them through troubled times. We lay the groundwork to better our present mutual relationships and those relationships of generations to follow.

https://www.mother.ly/news/coronavirus-covid19-viral-handwashing-lesson

As coronavirus ( COVID-19) continues to spread, health officials are driving home the importance of hand washing, but sometimes it is hard for parents to convince kids that washing their hands is important. After all, they can’t see the germs, so it is hard to understand why this matters so much.

That’s why we love how some creative teachers have used bread to show kids just how germy their hands can get.

“We took fresh bread and touched it. We did one slice untouched. One with unwashed hands. One with hand sanitizer. One with washed hands with warm water and soap. Then we decided to rub a piece on all our classroom Chromebooks,” teacher Jaralee Annice Metcalf writes in a now-viral Facebook post.

When the bread was left in sealed plastic bags the slices that had been exposed to more bacteria via laptops and unwashed hands grew the most mold.

The bread that had been rubbed on those Chromebooks might be the grossest piece of bread we’ve ever seen, and really underscores Jaralee’s point: “As somebody who is sick and tired of being sick and tired of being sick and tired. Wash your hands! Remind your kids to wash their hands! And hand sanitizer is not an alternative to washing hands!”

The CDC agrees with this elementary school teacher: Handwashing reduces the spread of diarrheal and respiratory illnesses (like COVID-19) so it’s a good idea to teach kids to do it properly and often.

Jaralee isn’t the first teacher to go viral for incorporating this experiment into her classroom and she probably won’t be the last. Full instructions for this project are listed on the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital website and are easy to replicate at home.

Her Facebook post has been criticized by people questioning the conditions of her experiment, but as she notes on her Facebook page, they’re kind of missing the point: “We are an elementary school. Not a fancy CDC lab, so relax a little and WASH YOUR HANDS.”

It’s good advice from a caring teacher and a reminder to wash our hands (and sanitize our laptops!)

[A version of this post was originally published December 13, 2019.]

Motherly's Becoming Mama Event

POSTED BY February 29, 2020

https://www.mother.ly/motherly-becoming-mama-event

The transition to motherhood is tough, and you deserve a little love! Join us March 28th for Motherly’s Becoming Mama event in NYC for a day filled with conversations and connections that will leave you feeling inspired. Get advice from expert panels, indulge in a little pampering, and meet other local mamas IRL for a day of empowerment and support.

Register now for early-bird pricing, and access to limited VIP tickets with exclusive gift bags.

Here’s what you can expect:

  • A mindful mama meditation to start your day.
  • Interactive panels and workshops focused on the hottest topics for new moms and moms-to-be. Check them out below!
  • A healthy lunch + delicious snacks
  • Pregnancy + postpartum pampering
  • Personalized gifts for you + your baby
  • The chance to test the hottest baby gear on the market
  • A swag bag filled with surprises
  • Amazing giveaways from our brand partners

Sat, March 28, 2020
10 am-2:30 pm
SECOND.
849 6th Ave
New York, NY 10001

REGISTER NOW

Here’s what we’ll be talking about on our panels:

Navigating the Fourth Trimester: Self-Care for Mom
While having a baby is a joyous occasion it often involves mom putting her own health on hold and speeding into overdrive to care for baby. Here postpartum experts will discuss the importance of postpartum mental wellness, and the importance of asking for help and finding support.

The Motherhood Advantage sponsored by Medela
Motherhood brings so many advantages to the workplace, and yet, it’s still a topic often talked about in hushed voices. We’ll invite Medela to sponsor this very important panel that will evolve this working mom conversation. Together we can work to erase the Motherhood Penalty, support moms with the proper tools and lift each other up in the workplace.

Parenting in Partnership: Learning to Share the Load
There’s never been a more equitable time to be a parent, and yet so many mothers still feel like they’re carrying more than their fair share. Let’s talk about how to create a parenting team from the start, with tips, tricks and expert advice on leveling the playing field between parenting partners.

*While many of Motherly’s events are family focused, there will not be specific activities or play spaces for babies or kids. This event is more mom-focused. Babies under 1 are welcome at this event, but a baby carrier is suggested. Please use your discretion.

Thank you to our sponsors buybuy Baby and Medela.

REGISTER NOW

https://www.mother.ly/child/childcare-emergency-plan

Caring for young children can be challenging enough on a perfectly normal day, but during an emergency those challenges are magnified. Natural disasters and emergencies—such as earthquakes, storms, fires, power outages, flooding or outbreaks that affect a wide community—obviously present a major operational challenge for childcare programs.

That’s why childcare providers need to have preparedness plans for emergencies and natural disasters that are likely to occur in their communities. Be sure to discuss emergency planning with your day care, childcare program or after-school care provider.

Here are a few helpful questions to ask to make sure that your child’s day care or childcare is ready for emergencies.

1. Does the parent handbook cover emergency planning? Is it up to date?

The parent handbook should serve as a guide for everything that takes place in a childcare program, from drop-off protocols to nap schedules, and it should also include information about the program’s emergency plans, response, and recovery. As situations change or arise, the parent handbook should be updated accordingly.

2. What is your communication plan for emergencies or disasters?

While 90% of childcare providers have written emergency response plans, only 70% have plans to communicate with family members during an emergency. Your provider should outline its plan of communication in its parent handbook.

3. Do you perform drills for disasters that are likely to occur in our area?

Ask whether your day care or childcare program has practiced its emergency response plans in a calm, safe environment—in other words, before it’s necessary.

4. What is your evacuation plan?

In the rare event that an evacuation is necessary, it’s important for providers to include up-to-date evacuation drills and protocols in the parent handbook. Caregivers, staff, parents and children should all know the designated meet-up point during a community evacuation.

5. Do you have a safe, designated evacuation spot in the event of a community evacuation?

Once staff and children calmly evacuate the building, there needs to be a safe shelter-in-place spot nearby. This location should be kid-friendly and have plenty of food, water and ways to keep young children occupied. The location should also be able to accommodate children with special needs and those with medical requirements.

6. What is your shelter-in-place plan?

During an emergency where parents are unable to access roads or public transportation, childcare programs need to have a shelter-in-place plan. Whether children stay at the facility or evacuate to a safe spot nearby, providers need to keep at least 72 hours worth of food, water, and medical supplies up to date. The program should also have parents write notes in advance letting children know that everything is okay.

7. Do you have post-disaster plans?

According to FEMA, more than 40% of businesses do not reopen after a disaster. If childcare programs close, parents cannot return to work and recovery cannot begin. Also, young children need a safe, secure, and familiar place to return to after a disaster.

8. How do you discuss emergencies in an age-appropriate manner with children?

A great way for care providers to introduce the concept of emergency plans to children is to have them help create emergency kits. This way children become familiar with emergency response items. Teachers should also let parents know how they plan to talk to children about emergencies in advance.

9. What are your policies for closing?

Childcare providers must give advance warning to parents about closures if there is an impending weather emergency. If roadways near the childcare program are typically out of use during an emergency, both parents and staff need to map out secondary pick-up plans in advance.

10. Are you in touch with local preparedness organizations?

Local emergency organizations can provide advice and tips to prepare for an emergency or natural disaster. Parents, care providers and community organizations should meet regularly and have the most recent copies of the parent handbook.

According to FEMA, in 2019 alone, there were 59 declared disasters in the U.S. These emergencies include earthquakes, tropical storms, fires, floods, severe storms, tornadoes, landslides, mudslides, extreme wind, and snowstorms. But basic advance preparation can go a long way toward helping parents and caregivers feel ready for emergencies and disasters, and can ensure that families and care providers stay safe.

A version of this post was originally published at the Institute for Childhood Preparedness

https://www.mother.ly/news/what-went-viral-this-week-support-for-breastfeeding-mamas-an-amazing-nicu-nurse

During a week like this one where talk of the Weinstein trial and coronavirus have dominated the news cycle, many of us do need a break from all the bad news.

A recent study suggests that people pay more attention to negative news stories than to positive news, but the research proves that even though many people are drawn to negative storylines, “it’s not the case that most people want mostly negative news all the time,” according to the study’s lead author, Stuart Soroka.

Soroka told the Los Angeles Times that there is a place for good news in modern media and since the news cycle has been quite negative this week so we are happily looking at the stories that shine a light on the good in this world.

So here are the good news headlines that made us smile this week:

​Viral Facebook post shows stranger supporting breastfeeding mom in restaurant 

This post is a few years old but went viral this week because stories this good never die on the Internet.

Back in 2016, Briar McQueen was a new mom who was nervous about her first solo trip to a restaurant with her baby. She expected some people might be judgemental about her breastfeeding, but instead, a stranger was incredibly supportive.

“Today was the first time I went out for breakfast alone with my 8 week old son, I had just received my breakfast and hot chocolate when Jaxon started crying wanting his booby so of course I fed him, after a few minutes this older lady walked up to me, I was scared, thinking she was gonna tell me to put my boob away, instead she starts cutting up my breakfast for me and said “what a good mama you are, we can’t have your food getting cold can we.” I honestly could have cried😍😢 loveliest lady EVER,” McQueen wrote in her now-viral Facebook post.

We totally agree and can see why this story is still being shared four years later.

This teacher’s mental health check-in chart is going viral 

Teacher Erin Castillo probably never imagined she’d be sitting down talking with Kelly Clarkson, but that’s what happened this month when she appeared on Clarkson’s show to talk about her viral mental health check-in chart.

Castillo asks her students to write their names on the back of a Post-It note and put it in the row that best corresponds with how they are feeling so that she can check-in with ones in the bottom two sections.

If this chart looks familiar it’s probably because Good Morning America profiled the teacher last spring. As Castillo told GMA, she never expected the chart she posted on her Instagram to keep going viral.

“To see this being used in multiple countries around the world, having [teachers] reach out from New Zealand and Africa…to hear actual stories of people helping their students, I’m really overwhelmed with joy,” she said.

This is so cool, no wonder educators (and even parents) are making the same charts. This is one time when it’s okay to copy someone’s work in the classroom. 😉

Lena Waithe voices first gay character in a Disney/Pixar movie 

Disney’s new Pixar movie Onward features the first openly LGBTQ character in the company’s history.

The character is Officer Specter, voiced by Master of None actress and screenwriter Lena Waithe, who identifies as gay herself.

According to Slate, Waithe’s character’s sexual identity is confirmed when the character (a cop) and her partner (voiced by Ali Wong), pull over a driver who blames his girlfriend’s sons’ behavior for his poor driving.

Waithe’s character replies sympathetically, saying, “My girlfriend’s daughter got me pulling my hair out.”

Onward hits theaters March 6.

NICU nurse goes viral after caring for father + son three decades apart

As first reported by the Courier News and then the Washington Post, a nurse in New Brunswick, N.J. has gone viral for being a fixture of the NICU for so long she’s caring for her babies’ babies.

Nurse Lissa McGowan went viral after new mom Renata Freydin’s noticed the nurse in her partner’s baby book looked a lot like the one who cared for her son Zayne Caldwell, who was born 10 weeks early last month.

As Freydin explained in her Facebook post: “Last Sunday, he dug out his baby book to show me. As I was looking through, I came across a picture of him as a baby and a lady holding him. I knew that lady!! I immediately asked him who she was and he confirmed that she was the nurse who took care of him during his stay in the NICU and his mom loved her so much that she needed a photo of the two of them on the day he was discharged! Well, the reason I know her is because I swore she was the nurse that had been taking care of our baby boy for the past three days! David didn’t believe me. We brought the picture to the hospital where 3 other nurses confirmed it was her! Yesterday (Valentine’s Day) she was back at work and taking care of our little nugget again so we had to recreate the picture! The past 2 weeks have been filled with worries and uncertainty but we can breathe easy knowing my lil nuggets nurse is the same one that helped the man I love when he was in the same situation.”

Newspapers picked up the story because it’s incredible and it is so worthy of our attention. NICU nurses work day in and day out helping babies and families and it is so incredible to see a nurse like McGowan recognized for years of hard work.

Go, Nurse Lissa!



https://babyology.com.au/lifestyle/things-to-do/play-and-activities/green-crafting-10-of-the-best-recycled-crafts-for-preschoolers/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=green-crafting-10-of-the-best-recycled-crafts-for-preschoolers

Perhaps you had not realised that your recycling bin was chock-full of potential craft projects? Or maybe you do realise this, but are a bit stuck for inspiration? Be stuck no more because this round-up of recycled craft projects is so fabulous it would inspire even the most non-crafty types! Let’s take a peek at […]

The post Green crafting: 10 of the best recycled crafts for preschoolers appeared first on Babyology.

https://babyology.com.au/parenting/family/grumpy-newborn-baby-breaks-internet-and-we-understand-her-feels/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=grumpy-newborn-baby-breaks-internet-and-we-understand-her-feels

Think you’re having a bad day? Then spare a thought for this grumpy bubba who has just been born. I was comfortable, you know Tiny Isabela Pereira de Jesus was happily enjoying the warmth and comfort of her mother’s womb when a doctor rudely birthed her via c-section, and exposed her to harsh fluorescent theatre […]

The post Grumpy newborn baby breaks internet – and we understand her feels appeared first on Babyology.

https://www.mother.ly/life/to-my-preteen-daughter-i-promise-it-gets-better

Dear daughter,
I know this age is hard. I can see the confusion in your face. The agitation in your decisions. The uncertainty in your steps.

You’re no longer a child, running blissfully through each day chasing only joy. You’re becoming aware.

Aware that people are looking. Aware that you can’t make everyone happy. Aware that your choices are becoming trickier and the consequences more complicated.

I know that this is an age where you feel lonely. Unworthy. Scared. Insecure. It’s so hard.

How do I know this? Because, my sweet girl, I remember this age too well.

The girls are sometimes mean. The boys too. You’re not sure who you are. You’re definitely not sure who your friends are. You’re learning adult-sized lessons in your child-sized body and sometimes all you can do is cry at the enormity of what you’re expected to handle already.

Know this: If I could, I would take it all on again for you. If I could, I would stand in your day, putting gossip in its place and walking with my head held high. I would smile in the face of bullying, knowing it is nothing more than a cowardly act to hide pain and jealousy. My instinct is and always will be to protect you from harm.

But I can’t.

All I can do is be your mom, open my arms, and make you feel safe here. I thought being that age was the most difficult years of growing up, but it wasn’t. The most difficult is watching you have to go through it. Knowing what is coming your way and knowing I can’t stop it.

These years are so important though. The struggle will teach you things about yourself you couldn’t learn any other way. I can’t tell you how important it is to be honest, to trust yourself, to feel with your whole heart even if it means it will get broken. Those are just words though until you experience it for yourself.

So I’m sorry baby, but there will be times when I let you fall. There will be times where I make you face your decisions head-on. There will be times where I give you the look that says “we talked about this” and you’ll have to accept the choices you made and the repercussions that follow.

There will also be times where I let things slide. Things you expected to get into trouble for because I remember how hard it is to do the right thing. And I’ll remember that there are still times right now, as an adult, as your mom, where I don’t know how to do the right thing either.

I will be your biggest cheerleader, but I cannot be a brick wall that blocks you from pain and problems. It will hurt me to watch, but you will make it. I know you will. You already have inside of you all the makings of an incredible young woman. Strength and softness, intelligence and courage.

I’ll push you to do things that scare you and hold you tight when your heart is broken. There’s no way to fully prepare you for all that lies ahead, but every day I will try to think of ways I can make it just a little easier.

I remember this age. I remember these feelings. I will try to remember that the best thing I can do for you right now is to be open and listen and try to let you learn and grow past it.

Love,

Mom

https://www.mother.ly/shop/meghan-markle-mom-style-pieces

When I think about Meghan Markle, her effortless style is usually one of the the first things that comes to mind. Whether she’s traveling, taking her dogs for a walk, or attending a royal event, her outfits always look timeless and put together. Yet somehow she still manages to wear outfits that feel way more accessible (even when she is donning a gorgeous—but expensive—coat we’ve had in our cart for much longer than we care to admit).

While I can’t quite afford a personal stylist yet or drop a few thousand on a bag, I did do a little digging and found that a few of her wardrobe staples are items that I can add to my closet, with a little investment. And, if you’re not in the market to invest this much, don’t worry—I found dupes that will do the trick!

Here are our favorite products to achieve Meghan Markle’s classic mom style:

Meghan’s pick: Rothy’s flats

rothys flat

Confession: I own a lot of shoes. But I wear my Rothy’s at least once a week and they’re the first shoe I toss into my luggage when I’m traveling because they’re so comfortable and can be machine-washed. The Point is my (and apparently Meghan Markle’s) favorite style because it elongates the legs and goes with literally anything you wear. I love that they’re made from recycled plastic water bottles, too. And, they just launched the Mary Jane—it has a bow!—if you prefer a more dainty look with a fun twist.

Our dupe: ASOS ballet flats

asos black pointed toe

This pointed pair will give a similar elongated look at just $23. They come in half sizes and if you’re unsure which size is best, ASOS offers a sizing recommendation. The material isn’t machine-washable (like our prized Rothy’s) but you can wipe these clean with a damp cloth to keep them looking like new.

Meghan’s pick: Wool wrap jacket

meghan markle wool coat

There’s just something so elegant about this coat. Maybe it’s the wrap waist that flatters any body type. Or, it’s the way the collared neck drapes (seriously it’ll even make wearing pajamas look chic). It’s become one of the most recognized pieces from Meghan’s wardrobe and we are obsessed.

Our dupe: Tahari wool blend coat

tahari wool blend cape coat

Looking for something more affordable? This coat is marked down to $83 from $360 at Nordstrom Rack. While we haven’t personally tried it, at 77% off, we can bet the quality is pretty up to par with a higher-end jacket. Plus, we’re obsessed with the pale blue and port wine colorways. The removable waist tie belt and shoulder cape overlay will have you feeling like Meghan Markle in just about anything.

Bonus: We love this Amazon dupe that’s just under $80.

Meghan’s pick: Longchamp bag

longchamp bag

On the quest for a bag that holds just about everything you need (without having to be a diaper bag)? Say hello to the Longchamp ‘Le Pliage’ tote. It’s water-resistant, has durable leather straps and folds up into a square for each storage or packing. I’ve had mine for more than five years and it’s still going strong—and it’s schlepped a lot of heavy things over the years. Plus, it just looks nice with everything!

Our dupe: Amazon shoulder bag

longchamp knock off bag

This dupe on Amazon has 59 great reviews and the large size is under $30! With three sizes, you can pick whatever best fits your style. Each bag comes with a zippered main compartment and interior pockets and yes, it even folds up just like the real thing.

Meghan’s pick: Birdies slippers

birdies slippers

Are they house slippers or the most comfortable flats you’ve owned? Spoiler alert: They’re both. Meghan has been spotted wearing The Heron style (I’ve been spotted wearing the slides around my apartment all day) many times and we think the velvet detail dresses up just about anything, even leggings. The no-slip rubber sole and 7-layer support means you can run around in these all day long without missing a beat.

Our dupe: Chase & Chloe pointy loafer

pointy toe loafer

While you won’t experience the cloud-like softness of Birdies, you can achieve a similar look with this pair from Nordstrom Rack for under $20. Both black and tan pairs come with a padded footbed, grip sole and a flexible construction (so hopefully no blisters even from day one).

Meghan’s pick: Madewell denim jacket

madewell denim jacket

I didn’t own a denim jacket until last year and since then, I’ve worn it in just about every season. Over summer dresses, paired with a T-shirt, over a blouse, you name it. It add just enough extra warmth without having to put on something bulky and is machine-washable. For an extra-cool and Meghan Markle factor, roughly roll up the sleeves twice.

Our dupe: Old Navy denim jacket

old navy denim jacket

Grab this $30 distressed denim look at Old Navy. I’m not sure how they do it, but their denim jackets are *so* soft. This one is slightly fitted so size up if you’re looking for a more oversized look. Just like the Madewell one, this hits right below the waist, making it great to pair with pants or dresses.


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