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July 2019 - Mood Baby

https://babyology.com.au/podcasts/feedplaylove/sarah-blunden-what-really-goes-on-inside-a-sleep-clinic/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sarah-blunden-what-really-goes-on-inside-a-sleep-clinic

If you suspect your child has a sleep disorder, you may find yourself with a referral to a sleep clinic. But what exactly happens in a sleep clinic? Professor Sarah Blunden is a paediatric sleep specialist with the Sleep Health Foundation. She explains what you can expect from a night’s stay at a sleep clinic.  Listen to Sarah […]

The post What really goes on inside a sleep clinic? appeared first on Babyology.

http://www.babycheapskate.com/2019/07/26/49-off-little-people-share-care-safari-interactive-lights-sounds-playset/

screen-shot-2019-07-26-at-6-56-39-amThis Little People Share & Care Safari Interactive Lights & Sounds Playset is a great deal at Walmart.com right now.

It’s 49% off at $30.69.

Shipping is free when you spend $35 or more.

This post may contain affiliate links. See BC’s disclosure policy for more info.

https://www.mother.ly/life/not-finding-out-gender-of-baby

After someone glances down at my (now-huge) bump and congratulates me, I can anticipate what comes next: “What are you having?” It’s a simple question, but it’s led to some surprisingly intimate conversations everywhere I go. In the checkout line at the grocery store. In the mascara aisle at Sephora. In my local pharmacy. In a hotel elevator. Even in the dentist’s chair when my mouth was pried open during a routine cleaning.

When I explain to the person asking that I don’t know the sex of my baby yet because my husband and I want to be surprised, I can see their facial expression shift from mild curiosity to wide-eyed fascination.

“But how do you prepare without knowing if it’s a boy or a girl?” (I have names picked out for either scenario.)

“What kind of nursery will the baby have?” (I gravitate towards neutral furniture and color schemes anyway.)

“What will you do about their clothes?” (I stocked up on essential onesies and both sets of grandparents have happily announced that they’re going on a shopping spree after my little one is born.)

And then there’s the big one: “Why would you choose to wait?”

I never had a big sit-down discussion with my husband about it—the subject naturally came up in conversation a few times long before we chose to have a child. We both instinctively knew it was the right decision for us.

We couldn’t imagine a more thrilling moment than having the obstetrician announce the news to us right there in the delivery room. The 40 weeks of anticipation leading up to our baby’s birth would feel like Christmas, our birthdays, and every other happy occasion magnified by one million.

I didn’t realize how in the minority we were in this simple (to us) decision. The first time it came up was during my nuchal translucency screening. One of my doctors asked if I wanted to order an optional specialized blood test to find out the sex. When I declined, his shocked expression threw me for a loop.

At each subsequent appointment, we had to tell the sonographers and medical professionals we came into contact with that we didn’t want to know. I couldn’t even check my test results on the patient portal. My husband and I joked that we should wear “Team we’re not finding out” stickers on our shirts to make things easier.

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Since then, our desire to keep the sex of our baby a secret (even from ourselves) continues to evoke strong emotional reactions on both sides of the spectrum. Loved ones have either applauded our decision or told us we’d lost our minds.

Some of the most memorable encounters were with people I had never even met before. A grandmother shopping with her daughter threw her arms around me in a warm embrace. “I’m SO excited for you! NO ONE does that anymore!”

Another day, I was testing out strollers when another expectant mama-to-be creating her registry struck up a conversation. “I would die if I were you,” she said, shaking her head in disbelief.

Just because we’re not finding out doesn’t stop everyone from guessing. We’ve heard it all from our relatives: “I dreamt that you’re having a girl and I’ve guessed eight out of the last 10 pregnancies correctly.” “Your stomach is shaped like a basketball, so it’s definitely a boy.” “Based on your sonogram photo, it looks like a girl.” “You have that glow about you so you must be having a boy.”

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It wasn’t that I couldn’t appreciate the benefits of finding out the baby’s sex ahead of time. During my pregnancy, several close friends and relatives announced that they were expecting, too, and I was *SO* excited to share in their joy of finding out whether it was a boy or girl.

But something in my heart kept telling me that waiting until the baby was born was the right thing for the two of us. This was the first of many times throughout motherhood that I realized I needed to do what’s best for my family.

My husband never wavered, but I have had some moments of self-doubt along the way. There was a period when my Instagram feed was filled with back-to-back photos of creative reveals featuring cakes, confetti guns, and even fireworks. By not broadcasting the sex of our baby, were we missing out on some sort of magical joy? And also depriving those closest to us that same happiness gained by knowledge?

But not finding out the sex came with some surprising benefits. My Type A tendencies were forced to take a backseat and I learned to appreciate the present.

I relinquished control and surrendered to the pregnancy process, unknowns and all. I didn’t go overboard and buy 50 newborn outfits because I didn’t want his or her wardrobe to consist entirely of gray and yellow. I wasn’t able to pre-plan everything or impose unrealistic expectations on what my relationship with my future child might be.

Now I’m one month away from my due date, and the joyous reality of getting to meet my child is finally sinking in.

I’m so glad that I didn’t succumb to the pressure and stayed true to myself. In an era of instant gratification and social media documenting our every move, the surprise of finding out the sex of my baby feels like it was well worth the wait.

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https://babyology.com.au/lifestyle/entertainment-and-technology/why-the-captain-underpants-backstory-gives-hope-to-every-kid/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-the-captain-underpants-backstory-gives-hope-to-every-kid

We live in an age where numerous children are diagnosed with ADHD and other learning difficulties that – for some – define what they are capable of achieving. They are told they aren’t good at listening. That they need to focus if they want to get things done. That they’re a nuisance or a distraction […]

The post Why the Captain Underpants backstory gives every kid hope appeared first on Babyology.

https://www.mother.ly/news/bachelor-star-jade-roper-tolbert-had-an-accidental-home-birth-in-her-closet

For some moms home birth is the plan, but for Bachelor alum Jade Roper Tolbert it was not. She planned to have her second child in a hospital, and his due date was supposed to be in August. But, the as-yet unnamed baby boy arrived in July and didn’t give mama time to get anywhere.

“I accidentally gave birth at home last night, in our master closet. I’ve been still processing the shock of this all, as this was not all at what I had planned, but I am so so thankful for each person who helped bring our son into the world safely,” Tolbert posted on Instagram.

She continues: “I’ll share my whole birth story soon, but long story short, my waters broke and 75 minutes later I gave birth to our healthy baby boy while clutching a bench in our closet. It was one of the scariest moments of my life because I felt so out of control, but Tanner, Tanner’s mom, my mom and the medics and firefighters kept me going when I felt like the world was caving in on me and my unborn baby.”

“I was going to share the happy, cute Instagrammable pics first, but this felt right to me. So incredibly grateful for the support system we had and for this beautiful boy I get to hold in my arms,” Tolbert explained.

This isn’t Tolbert’s first early birth. As People previously reported, Tolbert’s daughter Emmy was born four weeks early back in August 2017.

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https://www.swistle.com/babynames/2019/07/31/baby-naming-issue-is-the-name-they-love-too-unusual-made-up-not-really-a-name/

Dear Swistle,

I’ve been reading your blog for years, and am now in dire need of your help as a baby naming expert/unicorn.

It’s been a difficult road, but we are thrilled to finally be expecting our third and final child – a girl – in January. Our two boys have familiar, but not super common, Biblical names (not in the top 100). We are Jewish and our last name is a one syllable, multi-consonant mouthful beginning with “Sh.”

The name we absolutely love – the one that makes my heart sing and say, “Yes, this is my daughter” is Calla. But…. it’s just so unusual, particularly compared to my boys’ names, and according to assorted random internet commenters – (you should always listen to those, right?) – Calla seems like “not a name.”

What are your thoughts? Is Calla a unique, but legitimate, alternative to more common floral or antique charm names like Violet, Lily, or Lila and destined for its day in the baby naming sun? Or does it sound completely made up and/or unfinished? We don’t like invented names, uber trendy names, or non-traditional spellings. Other names I like are Nora, Eve, and Hazel, but I don’t love any of these nearly as much as I love Calla.

Thank you so much & I promise to send an update once she’s born!
~An indecisive mama

 

I’m so annoyed at the idea of some internet commenter saying Calla doesn’t seem like a name. What does that even mean? It IS a name! You know what makes a name seem like a name? INCREASED USAGE AS A NAME. You know what can inhibit increased usage as a name? GOING AROUND SAYING IT DOESN’T SEEM LIKE A NAME. I’m sure if there had been the internet back when the name Jennifer was first appearing in U.S. usage, we would have a record of commenters saying it didn’t really seem like a name to them.

Well. The name Calla IS a name, and we don’t need to waste time debating whether or not it SEEMS like one with internet strangers. We CAN discuss its usage as a name. The Social Security Administration makes available for download their background information on names going back to 1880. I checked in 1880, and there were 6 new baby girls that year named Calla. So the name has been in use in the U.S. since AT LEAST 1880. (You know what name has NOT been used in the U.S. that long? JENNIFER.) Let’s check in with the name every ten years:

1880: 6
1890: 10
1900: 7
1910: 5
1920: 14
1930: 10
1940: 5
1950: 12
1960: 8
1970: 5
1980: 7
1990: 41
2000: 57
2010: 233

And in 2018, there were 122 new baby girls named Calla. That puts it currently in a similar popularity category with Constance, Calista, Lucinda, Moira, Cecily, Lois, Joan, and Millicent.

It was used rarely but at a fairly consistent rate until 1986, when it abruptly increased in usage. I looked into it a little bit to see what brought it to everyone’s attention, and it seems to have been…a TV show about gummi bears? Well! That is not something I’d have known, nor an association I imagine lingers with any strength, though perhaps others can weigh in on this.

For me the only association is with the flower, so I do think of it as a less-common flower/nature/word name, roughly in the same category as the names Dahlia and Fern. I wouldn’t be surprised to see it getting more popular alongside names such as Ella and Lila.

I don’t think it matters if the name is less common than the names you used for your sons, as long as the particular mix of names doesn’t sound startlingly odd together: it’s not at all unusual for parents to have a different naming style for boys than for girls. My own style is Top 50 boy names and less common girl names, and it made me VERY NERVOUS when I was naming my girl, but it hasn’t been an issue at all. It helps that U.S. culture overall is more creative with and accepting of unusual names for girls.

Make sure to test out the first name and surname together (that is, without the middle name) to see if they blend together. I wondered briefly if Calla + S_____ might form the word “callous,” but I don’t think that happens with the initial sound is Sh- rather than S-.

I think if you love it, there is no reason I can see not to use it—and I think you’ll be happy you did.

https://www.mother.ly/news/amy-schumer-loves-her-warm-soft-post-baby-body-and-were-here-for-it

If there’s one thing we can expect from Amy Schumer, it’s total honesty. From her pregnancy to her early days as a mother, Amy has been candid (and hilarious) about the hardships that come along with the territory. But now Amy is dropping the funny and getting real about something she loves about the postpartum experience.

She shared a photo of herself and husband, Chris Fischer, with their son, Gene, enjoying a family day at the beach. Amy wears a seriously chic one-piece swimsuit while her husband carries their baby—it looks like the perfect family day, which is reflected in her caption: “We’re good.”

Fans are loving the shot and are reaching out to praise how fantastic the new mama (she welcomed baby Gene about three months ago) is looking. “Did you just deliver a small human? My youngest is 23, and you’re my swimsuit goal,” writes one follower. “So beautiful a normal woman’s body you look great!!” another adds.

Amy’s reply? “I am loving my warm soft post-baby body. Grateful to be feeling so strong again!” she writes. Yes, mama!

Adjusting to your postpartum body can be weird. Even if you look amazing to everyone else (like Amy clearly does), it’s normal to just feel off—that combination of hormonal shifts, the sudden loss of your baby bump, and the insane physical recovery from childbirth can really do a number on you.

But when you get to the point where you feel at home in your body again? That’s pretty amazing, especially when you realize how incredible it is that your body produced this little human. Amy has clearly reached that point, and we love that she’s celebrating it.

The comedian has been through a lot, from a battle with extreme nausea from hyperemesis during pregnancy to a C-section recovery, so it’s wonderful to see her feeling strong. Of course, it’s not all smooth sailing (is it ever when you have a newborn?). The actress also shared a photo of herself being pushed in a beach wheelchair, presumably because she wasn’t feeling 100% during the family outing (understandable as she had major surgery to remove an entire person from her body). But all in all, it seems like Amy is crushing the new mama game and feeling strong and gorgeous while doing so.

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https://babyology.com.au/parenting/family/new-research-discovers-link-between-particular-hormone-and-autism/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=new-research-discovers-link-between-particular-hormone-and-autism

We know that genes play a huge part in the development of autism, but new research indicates that a particular hormone may have a part to play too. The hormones and autism puzzle Science Daily reports that coming into contact with certain levels of oestrogen in-utero seems to be linked to the development of autism in […]

The post New research discovers link between particular hormone and autism appeared first on Babyology.

https://babyology.com.au/lifestyle/beauty-and-fashion/duchess-meghans-new-favourite-label-is-affordable-and-perfect-for-busy-mums/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=duchess-meghans-new-favourite-label-is-affordable-and-perfect-for-busy-mums

Duchess Meghan is a big fan of US label Everlane and we figured you’d want to find out a bit more about some of her favourite pieces. So let’s get cracking! View this post on Instagram The Duchess of Sussex is the Guest Editor for the September issue of @BritishVogue. For the past seven months, […]

The post Duchess Meghan’s new favourite label is affordable and perfect for busy mums appeared first on Babyology.

https://www.mother.ly/news/amy-schumer-loves-her-warm-soft-post-baby-body-and-were-here-for-it

If there’s one thing we can expect from Amy Schumer, it’s total honesty. From her pregnancy to her early days as a mother, Amy has been candid (and hilarious) about the hardships that come along with the territory. But now Amy is dropping the funny and getting real about something she loves about the postpartum experience.

She shared a photo of herself and husband, Chris Fischer, with their son, Gene, enjoying a family day at the beach. Amy wears a seriously chic one-piece swimsuit while her husband carries their baby—it looks like the perfect family day, which is reflected in her caption: “We’re good.”

Fans are loving the shot and are reaching out to praise how fantastic the new mama (she welcomed baby Gene about three months ago) is looking. “Did you just deliver a small human? My youngest is 23, and you’re my swimsuit goal,” writes one follower. “So beautiful a normal woman’s body you look great!!” another adds.

Amy’s reply? “I am loving my warm soft post-baby body. Grateful to be feeling so strong again!” she writes. Yes, mama!

Adjusting to your postpartum body can be weird. Even if you look amazing to everyone else (like Amy clearly does), it’s normal to just feel off—that combination of hormonal shifts, the sudden loss of your baby bump, and the insane physical recovery from childbirth can really do a number on you.

But when you get to the point where you feel at home in your body again? That’s pretty amazing, especially when you realize how incredible it is that your body produced this little human. Amy has clearly reached that point, and we love that she’s celebrating it.

The comedian has been through a lot, from a battle with extreme nausea from hyperemesis during pregnancy to a C-section recovery, so it’s wonderful to see her feeling strong. Of course, it’s not all smooth sailing (is it ever when you have a newborn?). The actress also shared a photo of herself being pushed in a beach wheelchair, presumably because she wasn’t feeling 100% during the family outing (understandable as she had major surgery to remove an entire person from her body). But all in all, it seems like Amy is crushing the new mama game and feeling strong and gorgeous while doing so.

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